English

Homonyms - Meaning and Examples of Homonyms

len Alfred Ajibola - Thu, 18th July, 2019 @ 16:17

Topics in English

Phrase: Types of Phrase Clause and types of clause explained Essay: How to write the major types of essay Nouns and Adjectives: Examples of nouns formed from adjectives Homonyms - Meaning and Examples of Homonyms Idioms and Examples of Idioms Synonyms: Meaning and examples of synonyms Figures of Speech: Meaning, examples and types of figure of speech Relative pronouns and compound relative pronouns explained with examples Transitive and Intransitive Verbs explained with examples Phrase explained with examples Essay: Formal, Semi-Formal and Informal Essays explained


Academic Questions in English

Please check out our Test Your Knowledge page to see all Questions and Answers

The acronym Wi-Fi stands for _____.

  • A. Wireless Files

  • B. Wireless Flips

  • C. Wireless Fidelity

  • D. Wireless Freedom

  • E. Wireless and Free

  • F. Wireless Fun

The words massacre and bloodbath are _____.

  • A. Antonyms

  • B. Synonyms

  • C. Homonyms

  • D. Homophones

  • E. Heteronyms

  • F. Heterophone

_____ are words or a phrases or expressions that have an exact or closely related meaning with another word or phrase or expression

  • A. Antonyms

  • B. Synonyms

  • C. Homonyms

  • D. Homophones

  • E. Heteronyms

  • F. Heterophones

A figure of speech that shows a balanced expression written in a reverse order is the _____.

  • A. Oxymoron

  • B. Hyperbole

  • C. Onomatopoeia

  • D. Synecdoche

  • E. Anaphora

  • F. Chiasmus

The little giant is here

The figure of speech used in the above instance is _____.

  • A. Oxymoron

  • B. Hyperbole

  • C. Onomatopoeia

  • D. Synecdoche

  • E. Anaphora

  • F. Chiasmus

_____ is a figure of speech that uses two main words 'as and 'like' as a source of comparison between two things that normally do not have anything in common.

  • A. Metaphor

  • B. Irony

  • C. Simile

  • D. Oxymoron

  • E. Personification

  • F. Hyperbole

Tell whoever may ask that I am not interested

Whoever as used in the above sentence is a _____.

  • A. Simple relative pronoun

  • B. Compound relative pronoun

  • C. Complex relative pronoun

  • D. Complicated relative pronoun

  • E. Universal relative pronoun

  • F. Base relative pronoun

Which of the following statement is incorrect concerning relative pronouns?

  • A. They refer to a noun that had been previously mentioned

  • B. They introduce relative clauses

  • C. They can function as an object in a sentence

  • D. They can function as a partial noun in a sentence

  • E. They can function as a possessive pronoun in a sentence

  • F. They can function as a subject in a sentence

LEN ACADEMY SMART SCHOOL SOFTWARE

Image

Read more on its smart academic features here


What are Homonyms?

As you may have noticed, some words in English have got the same spelling and sound but with entirely different meanings. This is the concept behind homonyms.

Sometimes, students may find it tough to construct sentences containing homonyms within them. Similarly, some students also find it difficult to decipher or interpret sentences with homonyms in them.

Please read on Synonyms here.

In this article, we will make up sentences containing homonyms, while also interpreting their meanings in the respective sentence where they are used.

Homonyms are words with the same spellings, same sounds but different meanings

Please read on Figures of Speech here.

Below are sentences containing homonyms with their respective meanings:

 

Keen

We have a keen match against Ronaldo’s team and Messi seems to be keen.

  • Keen: An involvement of people competing very hard for something.
  • Keen: Very interested in something.

 

Tear

Regardless the tear you shed, Mr. Frank will still tear your examination scripts.

  • Tear: The drop of liquid that comes out from a person's eye when they cry.
  • Tear: To damage something by pulling or cutting it apart.

 

Jot

There isn't any jot of truth in what he said, so I didn't jot anything down.

  • Jot: A very small amount of something.
  • Jot: To write something quickly.

 

Ball

James took the ball with him to the ball last night.

  • Ball: A round leather or rubber object that is played, thrown or kicked in the game of sports.
  • Ball: A large formal party where people dance.

 

Mass

The young man carried a mass of clothes on his head before the mass was celebrated.

  • Mass: A large amount or quantity of something.
  • Mass: A religious celebration of Christ’s last supper.

 

Instant

Prepare instant tea for me because I will be back in an instant.

  • Instant: A food that can be made very quickly and easily usually by adding hot water.
  • Instant: A very short period of time. It also means "to happen immediately".
Please read on Past Questions and Answers, WAEC, 1989 here.

Vent

The pretty lady had to vent her rage on the tailor for giving her coat a nasty vent.

  • Vent: To express an angry feeling.
  • Vent: A long thin opening or cut at the bottom or back of a jacket or coat.

 

Novel

This novel is novel.

  • Novel: A story book in which the characters and events are usually imaginary.
  • Novel: New and interesting.

 

Lie

The lady told a lie this morning before she went to lie in the hospital bed.

  • Lie: To say some that is not true.
  • Lie: To put one’s body in a flat position on a surface.

 

Utter

The statement the thief had utter was utter nonsense.

  • Utter: Said.
  • Utter: Total or complete.

 

Yen

Douglas had the yen to by a Lamborghini car but unfortunately he does not have enough yen on him.

  • Yen: A strong desire for something.
  • Yen: The unit of money in Japan.

 

Rest

We will rest our case when the rest of the student take their necessary rest.

  • Rest: Have no more to say about something.
  • Rest: Remaining part of something.
  • Rest: To relax, sleep or do nothing after a period of activity.

 

Address

I was able to address the victims after going through the address you gave me.

  • Address: A formal speech made in front of an audience.
  • Address: Details of where somebody lives or works.

 

Orient

When Tony needed someone to orient him on karate, he visited the orient.

  • Orient: To direct someone on something.
  • Orient: The eastern part of the world especially China and Japan.

 

Wave

The captain with waves was fortunate to be recognized by his waves after the ship sank under the waves.

  • Wave: A curring shape on a person's hair.
  • Wave: A movement of the arms and hand from side to side.
  • Wave: A raised line of water that moves across the surface of the sea and ocean.

 

Toast

Vivian wanted to toast the bride and groom before making us some toast for breakfast.

  • Toast: The act of wishing someone happiness by raising one’s glass of wine and drinking at the same time.
  • Toast: Slices of bread that are made brown and crisp by placing them close to direct heat.

 

Fair

Although the games occured on a fair day, the fair lady still had a fair performance.

  • Fair: Bright and not raining.
  • Fair: Pale in color.
  • Fair: Not too bad, Quite good and acceptable.
Please read on Idioms here.

 

Saw

I saw the movie yesterday and that reminded me of the old saw “make haste while the sun shine”.

  • Saw: Past tense of see.
  • Saw: A short phrase or sentence that states the general truth about life.

 

Racket

As soon as the players began to argue during the racket, the referee instructed them to stop making such a terrible racket.

  • Racket: A game of two or more people played with racket and a small hard ball in a court with four walls.
  • Racket: A loud unpleasant noise.

 

Plaque

The young girl was patient enough to fix the plaque on the wall before removing the plaque on her teeth.

  • Plaque: A flat piece of stone or metal with a name and date on it, fixed on the wall in memory of a person or an event.
  • Plaque: A soft substance that grows on the teeth and encourages the growth of harmful bacteria.

 

Lean

Lean at a lean man at your own peril.

  • Lean: To rest against something in a slopping position.
  • Lean: A thin person and without much flesh.

 

Earnest

Despite her unappreciated earnest effort, Deborah still remained an earnest woman.

  • Earnest: More serious with more effort than before.
  • Earnest: Very serious and sincere about yourself.

 

Arch

A soon as the bridge with an arch collapsed, he had the accident and was lucky to only hurt his arch.

  • Arch: A curved structure that supports the weight of something above it, such as a bridge or the upper part of a building.
  • Arch: The raised part of the foot between the sole and the heel.

Need more answers to this topic? Please enter your search below:

Kindly share this article via the links below:


len

Alfred Ajibola is a Medical Biochemist, a passionate Academician with over 10 years of experience, a Versatile Writer, a Web Developer, a Cisco Certified Network Associate and a Cisco CyberOps Associate.


Please click here to follow Len Academy on Google News.

Please like and follow our official facebook page here for great educational write-ups.

You can follow Len Academy on twitter here.Thank you.


Please Register here or Login here to contribute to this topic by commenting in the box below.


Amazing facts in English

Cat furnishings - Len Academy

The furry tufts of hair inside a cat's ear are called ear furnishings

There are only four words in the English language that end in 'dous'. These are:

  • Tremendous 

  • Horrendous

  • Stupendous

  • Hazardous

The only English word that ends with the letters 'mt' is dreamt and its derivatives; that is: undreamt, daydreamt, and redreamt

Los Angeles is America's second largest city. It's original name is 'El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río Porciúncula'. In English language, this means: 'Town of our Lady the Queen of Angels of the River Porciúncula'

If you close your eyes in a completely dark room. When you open them, the color you see is called eigengrau, which means intrinsic gray

I.e is an abbreviation for id est which means 'that is,'

E.g is an abbreviation for exempli gratia which means 'for the sake of example,'

You can read all of Wikipedia's content offline by downloading it's database. Below is the link to download Wikipedia's database:

Download Wikipedia's Database here

Bacteria is a plural word. Its singular is Bacterium

That smell that comes after a rain has a name. It's called petrichor

The word 'orange' does not rhyme with any other word in the dictionary


NOTABLE POINTS IN English

Homonyms are words with the same spellings, same sounds but different meanings.

Below are some sentences containing homonyms with their respective meanings:

  • Keen

We have a keen match against Ronaldo’s team and Messi seems to be keen.

Keen: An involvement of people competing very hard for something.

Keen: Very interested in something.

  • Tear

Regardless the tear you shed, Mr. Frank will still tear your examination scripts.

Tear: The drop of liquid that comes out from a person's eye when they cry.

Tear: To damage something by pulling or cutting it apart.

  • Jot

There isn't any jot of truth in what he said, so I didn't jot anything down.

Jot: A very small amount of something

Jot: To write something quickly

Please read more on homonyms here

Certain words in English language appear to be similar but are quite different in meaning.

The table below shows some examples:

 Childlike

 Childish

 Stimulus

 Stimulant

 Destructible

 Destructive

 Negligible

 Negligent

 Comprehensible

 Comprehensive


Synonyms should not be confused with the above instance. They are different words with similar meanings.

Please read more on synonyms here.

Some words always exist in the plural form. Examples of such words are:

  • Scissors
  • Shears
  • Alms
  • News
  • Trousers

Possessive adjective tells you the owner of a thing. For instance;

This is his car.

'His' in the above statement is describing him as the owner of the car; and this makes 'his' a possessive adjective.

That is your bag.

'Your' is a possessive adjective in the above statement.

Note: An adjective is a word that describes a noun.

Possessive pronouns show possession.

A possessive pronoun will always correspond with each of the personal pronouns. For Instance:

I own the book. ('I' is a personal pronoun)

The book is mine. ('Mine' is the possessive pronoun)

She owns a car. ('She' is a personal pronoun)

The car is hers. ('Hers' is the possessive pronoun)